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Showing posts from May, 2021

How to sew a fabric tray

After spending a bit of time figuring out how I could get a fabric tray to actually stay up by itself and be rigid enough to actually be called a tray, I ended up with this pattern.  What you will need: Cotton fabric Iron and ironing board Batting Rotary cutter and cutting mat (or scissors) Seam gauge or measuring tape Sewing machine Sewing machine thread and needle Optional: pins and safety pins Optional: walking foot (makes it easier to sew all three layers) or free motion quilting foot (if you’d rather quilt it than sew in the ditch) The steps: Cut  two pieces of fabric and a piece of batting to 13” x 13” Optional: you could embroider one of the pieces.  ‘Sandwich’  the pieces together. With one square of fabric on the bottom, the batting in the middle and the other square of fabric on the top. With the right sides of the fabrics facing away from the batting.  Optional but recommended: using safety pins, pin the three layers together in multiple places.  ‘Stitch in the ditch’  using

Making the winter soldier book

 I don’t know about all of you, but I know that I’m a huge marvel fan! (And Star Wars too!)  And the new Marvel series, Wandavision and The Falcon and The Winter Soldier just got me even more into Marvel! And that gave me the idea of creating the winter soldier book for myself! What I used: Printer + paper Black twill fabric Red cotton fabric Notebook (mine was about 7” x 5”) Sewing machine + supplies  To start , I came up with a basic idea of what I wanted, what I was looking for.  I decided that I wanted a tightly fitting book cover that fit as if it was the cover of the book. And I wanted it to resemble the book from marvel.  I started by creating  a basic book cover  design with the size of 10” x 29”, it ended up being very large.  ( Here’s what I did for the basic book cover: I took the strip of fabric and folded in the short side two times, both sides and sewed along the edge.  I then folded each side towards the middle with a gap in the middle of under 3” 1” down from the top I

How to embroider a patch

Patches are probably one of the most important projects that all embroiderers should know how to do. But they are also one of the most overlooked projects by embroiderers! Me? Oh I’m guilty of this too! I actually just recently learned how to make patches! Here I will share the ‘how to’ that I ended up with. After much trial and error of what worked and what didn’t as well as what materials to use, I present you with my final copy of, how to embroider a patch! In the next few weeks, I will share a bit more about patches, including, but not limited to, hot knifing, the many uses of patches, iron-on vs sew on, what makes a design patch worthy, why I use an ‘x’ on the material, and filled designs vs non-filled designs. After I have published most of them, I will create a part 2 article to this one where I compile them all so it’s easy for you to find whatever article you are looking to read! What you will need: Tear away stabilizer  Twill fabric Embroidery machine Machine embroidery needl

Patch box file

 Next week, I will be posting an article on how to embroider patches. Ever since I made my post a few months ago saying that my patch supplies had arrived, I have tested out many different ways to make them and I have tested out many different types of materials and steps.  In this article, I will be sharing the file for which I digitized. This file is to stabilize the twill fabric on top of your tear-away stabilizer in the hoop!  Not only does it keep your fabric stable whilst embroidering, which is very important, but it also reduces your use of fabric, meaning that you can make more patches with that metre of fabric! Here is the file: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1pUgklbqlpFW1i5fGAHZIGgBXMBhnaG7X/view?usp=sharing Please do not share this file with others. It is the property of Lizzsews. If you would like to share this file, please instead refer them to my website! I appreciate every single one of you who read my articles :).